Philip Larkin's "Sad Steps" And Sir Philip Sidney Of Sonnet 31 From Astrophel And Stella: The Moon


Philip Larkin's "Sad Steps" and Sir Philip Sidney of Sonnet 31 from
Astrophel and Stella: The Moon
An object can represent many different things to many different
people. One object of interest is the moon. Philip Larkin, the speaker of
Sad Steps, and Sir Philip Sidney, speaker of sonnet 31 from Astrophel and
Stella, have different feelings and attitudes towards the moon. Each
speaker uses various rhetorical devices to present their opinion of the
moon. Larkin uses these devices to show his bitterness and the ridiculous
nature of the moon and what people think of it, and Sir Philip Sidney uses
these devices to prevail his admiration of the moon in its grace amongst
the stars.
Sir ...

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moon “can judge of love”, and can solve his love troubles, as a “
lozenge of love” (Sad Steps, line 11) would. Sir Philip Sidney's attitude
toward the moon is quite serious, which is also the tone of the essay. He
takes the moon very seriously, as if it were divine. He adds character to
the moon, as if it were a person. He describes the moon's “love acquainted
eyes” (line 5) and remarks how “wan a face” (line 2) it has. This imagery
makes the moon more real and praiseworthy, for how can you admire a person
without a face? The imagery adds a face to the moon for others to admire
as does himself. Philip Larkin's attitude toward the moon is quite
different, although there is a definite connection between the two poems.
Larkin's attitude toward the moon is quite bitter. Larkin is crude
and sarcastic in his poem when talking of the moon. He teases Sidney's
view of the moon, calling it a “Lozenge of love! Medallion of art!/ O
wolves of memory! Immensements!” (lines 11-12) when ...

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Philip Larkin's "Sad Steps" And Sir Philip Sidney Of Sonnet 31 From Astrophel And Stella: The Moon. (2007, January 23). Retrieved January 22, 2018, from http://www.essayworld.com/essays/Philip-Larkins-Sad-Steps-Sir-Philip/59169
"Philip Larkin's "Sad Steps" And Sir Philip Sidney Of Sonnet 31 From Astrophel And Stella: The Moon." Essayworld.com. Essayworld.com, 23 Jan. 2007. Web. 22 Jan. 2018. <http://www.essayworld.com/essays/Philip-Larkins-Sad-Steps-Sir-Philip/59169>
"Philip Larkin's "Sad Steps" And Sir Philip Sidney Of Sonnet 31 From Astrophel And Stella: The Moon." Essayworld.com. January 23, 2007. Accessed January 22, 2018. http://www.essayworld.com/essays/Philip-Larkins-Sad-Steps-Sir-Philip/59169.
"Philip Larkin's "Sad Steps" And Sir Philip Sidney Of Sonnet 31 From Astrophel And Stella: The Moon." Essayworld.com. January 23, 2007. Accessed January 22, 2018. http://www.essayworld.com/essays/Philip-Larkins-Sad-Steps-Sir-Philip/59169.
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PAPER DETAILS
Added: 1/23/2007 07:38:34 AM
Category: Poetry & Poets
Type: Premium Paper
Words: 543
Pages: 2

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